Annual County Conservation Congress Meetings April 13

April 10, 2015 by Barbara With

The Penokee Hills, where Gogebic Taconite (GTac) recently dropped plans for a proposed iron ore mine. Act 1, the contentious new mining law, was written by Gogebic Taconite (Gtac) and stripped away environmental protections of state resources. Citizens can attend their county's Conservation Congress and introduce a resolution to repeal Act 1. Photo: Lyn Tribble

The Penokee Hills, where Gogebic Taconite (GTac) recently dropped plans for a proposed iron ore mine. Act 1, the contentious new mining law, was written by GTac and stripped away environmental protections of state resources. Citizens can attend their county’s Conservation Congress and introduce a resolution to repeal Act 1. Photo: Lyn Tribble

On Monday, April 13, 2015, the annual Spring Conservation Congress hearings will take place across the state. Each hearing—one in each county—begins at 7:00 PM. Citizens concerned about Wisconsin natural resources have an opportunity to provide input by voting on a variety of issues and testifying on proposed rule changes relating to how the Wisconsin DNR manages fish, water, land and wildlife.

See the 2015 questionnaire here. Find your county’s location here.

County residents can run for a seat on their county’s Conservation Congress, or elect other delegates to represent their views regarding natural resources.

Citizens also have the opportunity to bring new conservation issues of a statewide nature to the attention of the Conservation Congress through the citizen resolution process. Introducing resolutions is an opportunity to educate the conservation-minded public about what’s happening to the environment in their state.

Below are copies of some of the resolutions anyone can choose to bring forward in their county:

Red Granite Falls outside of Mellon, WI. Photo: Ros Nelson

Red Granite Falls   Photo: Ros Nelson

To introduce a resolution, simply print a copy, add your name, contact information and signature to the bottom of the resolution, then bring two copies to the hearing with you and give them to a DNR staff person there for posting. Also turn in your completed questionnaire.

You may introduce up to two resolutions. The resolutions will not be brought up until near the end of the hearing. While you can leave earlier if you need to, consider staying until your resolution is brought up so you can speak to its merit.

For more information, visit the DNR website or call Kari Lee-Zimmermann, Conservation Congress Liaison at 608-266-0580.

 

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